The Sugar Bowl Name and CupThe "Sugar Bowl," a solid silver trophy was made in London in the year 1830 during the reign of King George IV and bears the hall mark of the period.

The gift of this genuine antique to the New Orleans Mid-Winter Sports Association was made by the Waldhorn Company, Inc. [an antique shop which was located at 343 Royal Street in 1935 and remains there to this day].


The National Sugar BowlWhere Audubon Park now is, including the site of the original Sugar Bowl Stadium, once was the plantation of Étienne de Boré, a colonial planter, who turned from the cultivation of chicory and indigo, the then current crops, to the raising of SUGAR CANE, despite warning of others that Cane Juice would not crystallize.

Success crowned his effort in accomplishing the supposedly impossible when his sugar boiler exclaimed "it crystallizes!" and he became the founder of a National Industry that has flourished to this day.

[NOTE: de Boré's successful crystallization came in 1795; he would go on to become the first Mayor of New Orleans in 1803. He is buried in Saint Louis Cemetary #1.]


Louisiana is the Nation's Sugar-Bowl, and it is fitting that this game, played upon ground where the Sugar Industry was born, should pay tribute, in its small way, by adopting such a symbolic name.

Thru vicissitudes of tariff tinkering, crop-pests, wars and depressions, this industry, so vital to the well being of a multitude of Louisianians and so necessary to our nation, has survived, and again flourishes so that waving fields of the green cane, just before harvest time, stretch unbroken for miles and miles.

At the finish of "grinding," which is just about this season, it was the custom upon the old plantations to hold their greatest merriment of the year. So it is further fitting that a game played at this time of year should in memory of these great festivities couple its name with that of the sugar industry.

Excerpted from the inaugural Sugar Bowl Classic game program.